It’s true, you know. This document that you send out there into the world of job and internship openings is the official ambassador of YOU! So, you better make sure that it is properly representing you to every coordinator, recruiter and hiring leader out there sitting in the companies you would like to join.

I am not going to sugar coat it folks, the resume not the easiest thing to create. Sure, it’s easy to slap your name, the titles of some of your former jobs with a few bullet points about what you did, awards you won and classes you took on it, but is this type of resume really going to get you the results you want? Probably not.

You’re up against some pretty serious competition. There are thousands of people out there, looking for that next big break, that first step into the company they have always wanted to work for. And it is up to you, and your ambassador the resume to make sure the proper connections are made to get you the interview (Ahhh…the interview…we will leave that to another blog!) of your dreams!

You could ask 100 different professionals in the world of recruitment for resume advice and you could get 100 different responses. If that wasn’t frustrating enough, for you check-this-off-of-my-list-of-to-dos folks, your resume is a lifelong project that cannot be checked off, it is ever-changing. So take any resume advice with a grain of salt; manipulate these tid bits of info to fit you, your experiences and your goals; and come to grips with it staying on your list.

Just keep calm and resume on! Let’s get started!

  1. Your resume MUST be free of typos, look appealing to the eye and be full of truths

I know we have all heard this time and time again. Yeah, we get it already! But it is amazing just how many resumes I see with Manger instead of Manager, punctuation issues, a current position detail left off, or so much info stuffed onto one page that my mind can’t even process the paper-to-word ratio, and I want to run away screaming. Make it look nice. You CAN have a two-page resume as long as the info contained in it is relevant to what you are applying to. Don’t just rely on spell check; have a friend read it over, make sure the grammar is good to go, and make it a good read for me! Also, e are looking for the non-fiction works here, people. Make sure you can live up to the expectations your resume has laid out.

  1. Your resume should contain a few sections to make it easy for the recruiter to quickly find what they are looking for. Here are some suggestions:
    1. Education: Include campus name, major (and relevant minors), and graduation date. Include your GPA if the job description requires it. A good rule of thumb is to leave your education section at the top of your resume for up to two years past your graduation date
    2. Relevant experience: This heading can work better for some because you can include work, volunteer, leadership and school project work her, as long as it is relevant! Make sure to include the company name, your title, dates of employment and no more than three to four bullets detailing your experiences
    3. Additional experience: This area would cover additional experiences that are important, compliment the position you are applying to and you want to include but aren’t 100% relevant to the position you are applying to.
    4. Technical or additional skills: Make sure you include all technical skills you have experience with as well as any language skills and other unique abilities that are relevant to the position you are applying to.
    5. Awards or accomplishments: If you have numerous awards and accomplishments that you feel are relevant, you could include them in this section. Make sure that you include some information about what the award is and how you achieved it if it is not self-explanatory.

Stay tuned to the blog next week for part two of this article!

Elaine
ElaineDisney Professional Internship Recruiter

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