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I was hesitant applying for a Disney engineering internship because I thought I was just setting myself up for rejection. Disney is the known for its efficiency and I knew this is the best place to learn and grow as an IE. I got over my fear of not having a strong enough technical background and applied. Here I am, three professional internships later, and still working hard and being nice to people.

Kate, Industrial Engineering Intern, Disneyland Resort

 

 

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Work hard, seize every opportunity, and pay attention to detail. Learn from other professionals by example on their experiences, and don’t be afraid to ask questions! In regards to landing a Professional Internship, definitely apply through the website, but also look on LinkedIn or Campus Resources in regards to finding a connection and reach out. Even if you don’t get the position you want the first time, keep in touch with the people you spoke to, learn what you could have done better, look into other potential opportunities similar to what you want, gain more experience, and try again.

Ayesha, Entertainment Marketing Intern, Disney ABC Television Group

 

 

In a field that’s rapidly changing day by day, it’s important to stay on top of the latest trends, technologies and best practices people are utilizing in the industry. So make sure you are able to demonstrate your passion for technology not solely from a hard skills perspective, but also from a high level, conversational perspective as well.

Jordan, Software Engineering Intern, ESPN

 

 

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Take as many entertainment law classes that your law school has to offer. Really take advantage of your school’s professors and resources. Network as much as possible because you never know where something may ultimately lead you. Read the Trades and keep yourself informed about what’s going on in the entertainment industry!

Grace, Business & Legal Affairs Intern, Marvel Studios

 

 

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The best piece of advice I can give to current professional interns (and those seeking a professional internship) is to make a habit of asking for feedback. As an intern, you should expect to grow within your position and gain an understanding of your area through projects and interactions with those in the area; this means asking plenty of questions. When you get to the point where you present your own material or assist in larger projects, it may be a little nerving to ask your peers and superiors for feedback, but it is necessary, not only for the growth of the business, but for your own development as a professional. Not only will doing this help you develop better content and projects, but it will also build trust between you and your team.

Luke, Facilities Operations Intern, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts – ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex

 

 

You create your internship experience. While there are routine tasks to perform, you should always go the extra mile to take on new responsibilities or pitch your own. In my opinion, that’s the best way to enrich your professional internship and make the most of your limited time.

Kalyn, Reporting Intern, ABC News – Brian Ross Investigative Unit

 

 

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Like many fields nowadays, the media industry follows the cliché of “who you know.” This does not necessarily mean that if one has no connections in the media industry, she can’t join the club. That being said, I have learned through my experiences in the media industry that countless opportunities are made behind closed doors. While building one’s skills, know that that is only half the battle. The other is reaching outside of one’s comfort zone to make those industry connections through internships, volunteer work and meet & greets. With every person I have met in media, there has been at the very least one takeaway piece of advice/knowledge that has shaped how I represent myself and my work in my career.

Abigail, Digital Media Video Intern, Marvel

 

Leila
LeilaDisney Internships & Programs Communications Team